Reverse Implied Odds

9 Feb by admin

Reverse Implied Odds

Successful poker players are familiar with topics such as math and how to deal with terms such as outs, odds, pot odds and implied pot odds. The concept of reverse implied odds goes one step further. They are particularly important in No Limit Hold’em Poker. 
Definition
Reverse implied odds, or in German the “reverse implied probabilities”, are a concept of the American poker player and author David Sklansky, which he introduces and explains in his famous work “Theory of Poker”. Reverse implied odds, or RIO for short, describe a phenomenon in a marginal hand situation in which one has no initiative.
In contrast to implied pot odds, reverse implied odds take into account possible losses if the opponent improves his hand in the hand or already holds the better hand. Implied pot odds take into account the money that could still get into the pot. RIO, on the other hand, are just a situation-dependent extension of implied odds.
When and Why Should One Calculate the Reverse Odds?
Reverse implied odds become important when a player with an average hand and little chance of improvement may currently have the strongest hand, but there are still one or more opponents in the game who bet or raise. If the opponent already has a good hand or can improve his hand, it can be assumed that he will also bet in the following rounds. If the opponent has bad cards, he will probably not bet or even fold his hand. In this case, you would have to spend more money to find out that you were beaten than to win.
For example, if you have the nuts, you only have to deal with the implied odds. Those who do not have the nuts often find themselves in a reverse implied odds situation, as there is always a risk that they will only have the second best hand. With reverse implied odds, odds can change to negative in certain situations:
Reverse Implied Odds Situation
The player does not know how to classify his own hand correctly
The chances of getting a better hand than the opponent has or when the opponent can still get are slim
A call would tie the player to the pot
The opponent is in an “early position” (i.e. to the right of yourself)
The player has other opponents who could raise again
Now that you understand what reverse implied odds are and how you can identify one, make use of it in your next poker game.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *